The Decolonization of the Caribbean: Q & A to Bring Into Your Classrooms About Today’s Struggle

To help our ourselves & youth we teach understand why Puerto Rico and the sister islands of the Caribbean have been so devastated by Hurricane Maria, we have to understand the history, politics, and systems in place that allowed for this to happen in the first place. Environmental disasters are going to happen because that’s nature, but there’s nothing “natural” to just how devastating their impacts can be on the people, animals, and communities they hit.  The following are some questions and answers that will hopefully provide educators & students with the historical facts surrounding the humanitarian crisis that is now looming in Puerto Rico, and other Caribbean islands, and is impacting many of our kids and their families as we speak. Continue reading “The Decolonization of the Caribbean: Q & A to Bring Into Your Classrooms About Today’s Struggle”

To My Black Son’s Future Teacher: See My Child

To My Black Son’s Future Teacher,

As the new school year approaches and I prepare to entrust my child once again to a teacher (whom I am uncertain has been trained in how to best support the intellectual and psychological growth of children of color), I begin to think about what I want for my child. I keep coming back to one outstanding desire: that you see my child. Continue reading “To My Black Son’s Future Teacher: See My Child”

Addressing Police Brutality With Youth: A Book Review on Momma, Did You Hear the News?

Ok, so where do I begin with the shortest, yet heaviest book I’ve ever read? Let’s begin with a brief synopsis.  Momma, Did You Hear the News is a children’s book about a ten year old boy, Avery, who has become frantic after hearing and watching stories on the news about the murders of unarmed Black men by police. Continue reading “Addressing Police Brutality With Youth: A Book Review on Momma, Did You Hear the News?”